Impressive Photos of the Titanic

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

We all know the story of the Titanic from the movie, but there is a lot of real evidence about the ship that many of us might find interesting. After the movie craze inspired a lot of people to research more and learn details about the grand ship, a lot of photos started to come out, which were previously thought to be uninteresting. But now, with the new excitement about everything Titanic, people were going crazy for any small bits of real information they could find. Recently, even more, photos resurfaced, bringing us even closer to the ships’ history, the events on it, and the people that traveled by it. Here there are!

The Southampton Docks

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

As the Titanic prepared to set sail on April 10th, 1912, people crowded the docks of Southampton to see the ship take off. They wanted to get as close as possible to the marvel and see for themselves what a ship of its size may look like. It was truly a great event for the whole city and one that was remembered for decades after.

The Great Gantry

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

The Titanic was a massive building site before it was finished, and it had to be constructed on even bigger slipways. There were no slipways that could fit the Titanic at that time, so new ones had to be custom-built. They were called The Great Gantry. The slipway cost $150,000 and took over 15,000 workers to complete. It was a beast of a construction site!

An Expensive Ship

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

The Titanic, back in its time, was the world’s most expensive ship, and also the largest. It cost a whopping $7,500,000, so it was a real investment on the side of the builders. Just the anchor alone was so heavy that twenty horses were needed to transport it to the harbor. It was a ship that weighed 900 tons and housed 840 staterooms in all, 416 in first class, 162 in second class, and 262 in third class. We also have a recent photo of the anchor, looking much less imposing than it must have been back in the heydey of the Titanic. 

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

First-Class Dining Hall

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

The first-class dining saloon was the largest room on the ship and it could fit 500 passengers. Its interior was elegant and beautifully decorated. The walls were painted white and had glass windows, giving the room a stunning appearance. Special lighting was used in the evening for an even nicer atmosphere.

First Class Smoke Room

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

The passengers in the first-class could also enjoy a lavish smoke room. It had walls that were paneled in Georgian style mahogany with mother pearl details. There was a fireplace for intimacy, and the smoke room was solely designed for men to come and mingle. There were enough tables and comfortable chairs for long conversations.

Living in the Second Class

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

Whole seven decks were designated to the second class on the Titanic. The facilities and rooms were excellent, and could sometimes even rival those in the first class. The public areas for the second class included a library, smoking room, several dining rooms, and much more. The decorations were tasteful and luxurious, making the passengers feel like they were getting spoilt.

The Grand Staircase

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

The grand staircase is probably one of the most famous and talked about features of the Titanic, mostly because of its role in the movie. The stairs were made of English oak, designed in neoclassical style. The whole space was meant to exude luxury and even overwhelm the passengers with its beauty, which it certainly did.

The Promenading Decks

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

The passengers in the second class could choose between a variety of promenading decks. The biggest of them all was a 145-foot long open stretch. People could come here to enjoy the fresh breeze from the ocean or sip a beverage while looking out into the distance. There were enough iron benches and chairs on the decks for everyone to enjoy the beauty of the open waters in peace. The decks today lay at the bottom of the ocean floor, and we can only imagine the people who once walked on them.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

The Gym in First Class 

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

It seems like a modern luxury, but the Titanic also had a fully equipped gym onboard. Open for its first-class passengers, including ladies, the gym had an electric camel, electric horse, several cycling machines, and a rowing contraption. Tickets to the gym were sold to the first-class passengers, so they had to pay for the privilege of working out in possibly the first-ever gym on a ship.

The Reading And Writing Room

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

With beautiful creamy white walls and elegant furnishings, the reading and writing rooms of the Titanic were mainly designed for the first-class ladies. The rooms were the equivalent of the men’s smoking room, and a place that brought the ladies together over their books, or simply for some good old gossip.

Cafe Parisien

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

One of the most popular eating areas on the ship, the Cafe Parisien very closely resembled the boutique cafes of Paris. With tasteful decorations in the French style, passengers came here to imagine they were in the European city while floating somewhere in the middle of the Atlantic. Just another great feature of the Titanic!

Titanic Entertainment

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

The ship offered so many possibilities for entertainment. Its passengers could choose from the many rooms to get together in, but also, there were a number of activities for both adults and children. For example, a lavish first-class Turkish bath, where gentlemen could enjoy steam rooms, private toilets, and a shampooing room. Aside from this, a big squash court ready to be used by anyone who fancied some sports. There was also a spacious swimming pool designated only to first-class passengers. All that is left of the entertainment areas of the ship is pieces of metal, deep underneath the ocean. 

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

The Captain

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

The Titanic captain has truly become a notorious figure in history. His name was Edward J. Smith, and before his duties on the Titanic, he served as a British Merchant Navy officer. The history of his life is quite unknown, but many people want to find out more about the person who was behind the wheel of the most famous ship on the planet. 

A Cold Day Onboard

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

What we all want to see the most from the Titanic must surely be the daily life of the passengers. New photos have been uncovered, showing us just that. Even though the Titanic sailed in pretty cold temperatures, people still ventured outside onto the decks to get some fresh air. Wearing winter coats and prepared for the cold winter, we can’t help but wonder what they must have been thinking about as they strolled up and down the iconic ship.

The Notorious Iceberg

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

An iceberg came to be the curse of the Titanic. However, many people are interested in learning more about the specific piece of ice which sunk the apparently unsinkable ship. What we do know is that it took about 40 minutes for the ship to sink completely, and the Titanic now sits under 12,500 feet of water.

The Destiny of the Bellboys

Image Credit: Cruise-line History

Image Credit: Cruise-line History

The job of these boys was to carry heavy luggage and do various tasks for first-class passengers. Unfortunately, none of them could escape the tragic fate of the Titanic. James Humphries, who commanded one of the lifeboats, explained what happened to them. They were called to the main cabin shortly after the collision with the iceberg, but by the time they were ordered to try to save themselves, it was too late to get to the lifeboats.

Paper Boat

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

It is widely known that cutting corners on the cost of the build is what brought the Titanic to doom. Low-quality materials were used, and many issues overlooked, just so that the ship can get built as cheaply and as fast as possible. The steel used for the build was substandard, and any engineer could easily detect that this would cause some problems down the way. For a ship this size, only the best would do, and since the Titanic seemed like it was built out of paper, it suffered the tragic end that it did. The huge hole the iceberg made in it could have been avoided. 

Learning From Mistakes

Image Credit: National Archives

Image Credit: National Archives

All the new evidence that was presented in the Titanic trials was leading to the bettering of ship regulations, and more responsibility given to the builders of such ships. Because of the terrible tragedy, and the reasons that caused it, everyone was beginning to see the lessons, and learn from them.

The Titanic Memorial

Image Credit: Getty Images

Image Credit: Getty Images

The Titanic disaster happened over 100 years ago, but it is still fresh in everyone’s minds. And so it should be. Remembering such tragic events will hopefully help us avoid them in the future, and we are also paying some due respect to the unfortunate victims of the sinking. There are numbers of memorials, books, or documentaries about the Titanic, so people can gain more knowledge about the event.

The story of the Titanic will continue to fascinate people for centuries to come. We will always want to know more about the passengers who sailed on this famous boat. The constant uncovering of new pictures and evidence about the ship and the life on it is a great treasure trove of information. We hope more and more photos will keep resurfacing!

Sources: All That Is InterestingHistory  

Please disable your AdBlocker

Advertising helps us continue to provide quality content. For instant unlimited access. Please disable your AdBlocker on our site and refresh the page.