Emojis You've Been Using Wrong

Emojis are a practical and sometimes fun resource for sending messages on social networks and WhatsApp. But did you know that you may be using some designs with a different meaning than what they represent? Some of the real meanings of these emojis may surprise you, check out some of them.

Hands on Your Head

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

No, this emoji does not represent a ballerina or a dancer. Nor is it an "oops, I missed" sign. It is a person making the "OK" gesture with the body, instead of just a circle with two fingers. Believe it or not, this is the real meaning of it!

Person Holding His Hand

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

This is another example of an emoji that can be interpreted in multiple ways because nobody knows exactly what it means. The official name is "person tipping hand," and, according to Emojipedia, it represents a "person at the information desk." This emoji is associated with the idea of ​​someone offering help.

Drop Running Down Your Face

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

It may be difficult to notice on the small screen of the cell phone, but this face is not crying. The drop runs down the side of the face and not from the eyes. The official name of this emoji is "Sad but relieved." The gout is from sweat, not tears, and it represents a stressful situation.

Steam Coming out of the Nose

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

The smoke that comes out of the nose of this emoji may look like a representation of an angry person, but initially, it was not. The emoji was approved in 2010 and had the official name of "Face with the appearance of triumph," again inspired by Japanese manga. Today, the code name is "Face with steam from the nose." That is, it is an expression of triumph, not anger.

Twins With Rabbit Ears

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

The image shows two people with spikes on their heads in party costumes and is usually used to represent friendship. These tips are actually ears. The name of the emoji is "People with bunny ears" and are a reference to the famous "bunnies" of Playboy magazine.

"X" arms

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

The crossed arms forming an "X" in this emoji simply mean "no." The gesture is used in the "Deal or no deal" auditorium program, shown in Brazil by Silvio Santos under the name "Top or not," in 2006, to represent that the participant "does not accept" the proposal made by the opponent in the game.

Hang Loose

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

The "hang loose" originates from the "shaka" sign in Hawaiian culture. But this emoji has nothing to do with it. The gesture, according to Emojipedia, represents the expression "call me," since the fingers are shaped like a telephone. The original shaka, also called hang loose, has the same shape, but the fingers are pointed upwards. There is still no official emoji for hang loose.

Rock 'n Roll

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

This emoji, although very similar to the "rock'n'roll" symbol, has nothing to do with it. According to Emojipedia, the hand with an open thumb means "I love you" in sign language. So, don't send this wrong emoji to anyone!

Eye in Speech Bubble

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

This is one of the most enigmatic designs in the modern emoji alphabet. Created in 2015, the image represents a campaign by the Ad Council, a non-profit organization in the United States, against bullying. The sign means, according to the organization, "I am a witness."

Man in Suit Levitating

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Don't look now, but there is a man in a suit levitating on his emoji keyboard. And he even has a name: Walt Jabsco. The art is a reference to a logo for a UK ska record label in the 1970s called 2 Tone Records. The symbol was part of the Webdings font, created by Microsoft in the 1990s. The official explanation of Unicode is that the levitating man represents the shape of an exclamation point.

Anger Symbol

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Another reference that manga fans may have already noticed. This strange symbol is used in Japanese comics to represent the leaping veins on the forehead of an enraged character. That is why the emoji is called "anger symbol."

Dash

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Another symbol inspired by comics, and that can also be easily confused with something else. The emoji above is called "dash" and represents the trail left by someone who has just left the scene. Emojipedia suggests inserting a person or a car next to the drawing to make more sense.

Hot Springs

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

This emoji somewhat resembles the Java logo but has no connection with the programming language. The design's official name says it all: "hot springs." The symbol is quite universal in Japan to represent "onsen" sites, which are heated baths or natural pools.

Trackball

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

There are several emojis on the Unicode keyboard representing devices that new generations are probably unaware of. There is a pager, a floppy disk, a VHS tape, and the strangest of all, a trackball: an alternative to the mouse that allows you to control the cursor on a PC by rotating a sphere.

Hundred Points

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

It is obvious that this emoji represents the number 100, but the story behind it is a little more complicated than that. The cursive spelling and the two risks below the number indicate that it is the representation of a school grade, the kind that American teachers leave in student tests. The number "100", in this case, is equivalent to our "note 10".

These are the correct definitions for these emojis. But the truth is that it is much better to use them as we wish, right? So, did this article make you rethink the use of some of these emojis? Which one of these did you use "wrong" before?

Sources: EmojipediaEmojis.wiki, EmojiDictionaryAd CouncilNews Week

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