Recent Expedition Unveils What Has Happened to the Titanic

Titanic isn't just James Cameron's 1997 romantic drama. She is a living memory that's sitting on the sea bed for about 108 years! It was a stunning journey for the crew onboard the Limiting Factor mini-submarine. Diving around 370 miles off the Newfoundland coastline, the team was stunned at what they saw some 12,500 feet below the sea.

A Sharper Focus on the Titanic

Image Credits: NOAA General Counsel

Image Credits: NOAA General Counsel

The crew was sure that no man on earth would have ever witnessed what stood before their eyes. The rusting remains of the majestic RMS Titanic lay below the North Atlantic Ocean. Without halting a second, the divers began investigating the mighty ship. But something unexpectedly haunting was waiting for them. And what they saw down in the deep ocean brought the vessel's untimely tragedy into sharper focus.

The Olympic Class Legacy

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

According to history, the Titanic was one of the three ships that belonged to the Olympic class. She was ultimately the second legacy that marked the golden era of transatlantic ocean liners. The Titanic was accompanied by two other major vessels, the Olympic and the Britannic. And all the three ships belonged to the White Star Line's fleet. But the mighty vessel's conception wasn't a smooth start.

The Size was the Ultimate Future

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

The Titanic was engineered after a discussion between White Star Line's boss, J. Bruce Ismay, and American business tycoon, J.P. Morgan. Keeping in mind their rivals, Ismay decided that their business' future lay in size rather than speed. Their discussion ultimately paved the way for the gigantic Olympic-class behemoths on the planet.

A 108-Year-Old Wreckage

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Having embraced the ocean for 108 years, the Titanic still possessed the power to stun her visitors. Though her maiden voyage came to a tragic halt, the ship attracted considerable fanfare when she started her first voyage from Southampton, England. But her days of fame didn't last long.

The First Voyage Becomes the Last Forever

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Those who stood at the dock waving goodbye to their near and dear ones on board never knew that it would be their last journey forever. For decades, the exact location of the Titanic remained a mystery. Technology back then wasn't helpful either. None of the expeditions could reach anywhere near the wrecked ship.

The Devastating Voyage

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

The collision of the massive iceberg didn't quite breach the hull, but it was strong enough to bend the vessel's steel plates. The impact eventually caused gaps in between them through which the icy water seeped into the ship's watertight chambers. The mighty vessel started to give in to the forces of nature.

An Unexpected Tragedy in History

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

While the Titanic was engineered to withstand just four water-filled compartments, the strike marked the beginning of her end. The tragic end of the unsinkable Titanic uprooted questions after the news spread like wildfire. Public demand and inquiries in both the U.S. and Britain started to surface.

Tracking the Location Wasn't Easy

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

But the nations pointed out towards the limited lifeboats onboard. And it was also claimed that the ship's captain had paid little attention to the iceberg warnings, while the Titanic was still cruising at high speed. Seventy years passed by, but no one was able to point the exact location of the doomed ship.

The Ship's Wrecked Remains are Tracked

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Eventually, a French-American team managed to graph the Titanic's wrecked site using their remote-controlled sub, Argo. The stunning photographs of the vessel surfaced around the world. And this was followed by various expeditions, including the last one that came in 2005.

Only the Ruins Remain

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Now it was Limiting Factor's turn to unveil some stunning mysteries of the unfortunate ship. The crew aboard the Limiting Factor was the first expedition by a manned sub in 14 years. The mission was eventually led by Victor Vescovo, boss of Caladan Oceanic. The team was at a depth of about 12,500 feet, gazing at the ruined remains of the Titanic.

Nothing More than Rust and Dust Remains

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

The men quickly took stunning photographs using their high-tech 4K cameras aboard their submarine. But what the expert team of divers found at the location of the historical wreck was extremely shocking. The 108-year-old wreckage was nothing more than a massive chunk of debris buried in the ocean.

Mortifying Remans Consumed by Nature

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

The crew was shocked to see the Titanic disappearing and returning to its elemental form. Though the majestic vessel provided refuge to a diversified number of marine lives, its remains stunned the divers. Nature seemed to consume much of the ship's mortifying pieces.

The Ship's Slow and Steady Disintegration 

Image Credits: Twitter/AtlanticProds - Atlantic Productions/Back to the Titanic

Image Credits: Twitter/AtlanticProds - Atlantic Productions/Back to the Titanic

The captain's bathtub that is the famous part of the Titanic, was no longer seen at the wrecked site. The acidic reaction of the seawater, strong ocean currents, and bacteria that consume metal seemed to contribute to the disappearance of the Titanic's mangled remains.

Titanic to See the End Very Soon

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

The vessel, which sank in two parts, was found about 370 miles off the coast of Newfoundland. She lay at a depth of approximately 12,500 feet in the dark waters of the Atlantic, slowly bidding adieu to the world. The crew was shocked to see years of debris and rust coat the historic vessel. Even the bunkers, luggage, and also the face of a porcelain doll were slowly returning to nature.

Century-Old Wrecked Ship is in Her Last Days

Image Credits: Shutterstock

Image Credits: Shutterstock

The wrecked vessel is resting peacefully at about 12,500 feet underwater for the past 108 years, and its decomposition isn't a big surprise at all. Sadly, the ship's rusted remains turn to dust when disturbed, putting the historical legacy in danger of disappearing quickly with time. 

While certain artifacts have been recovered from the Titanic, the massive ship is still seeing her last days underwater. The majestic vessel that's resting on the seabed is slowly but steadily returning to nature. 

Sources: Scribol, BBC, Magellan Times, Time, National Geographic

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