43 Greatest of all time guitarist revealed

Image Credits: Larry Busacca/Getty Images for Songwriters Hall Of Fame

Image Credits: Larry Busacca/Getty Images for Songwriters Hall Of Fame

It’s not unlikely that you would have come across articles that create a list of the best this, or the best that around the world. But fewer subjects raises more controversy than naming the best guitarists in the world. Here is a list of the 43 greatest guitarists of all time; it’s not a list that we have dreamed up. We’ve searched the web, trawled magazines and have reviewed several lists of the best guitarists ever before coming up with this list of 43. Read on to see artists that have got people swept off their feet through the riffs and rhythm in the mastery of their six-string strokes.

43. Bo Diddley

Ellas Otha Bates, also known as Bo Diddley is a Chicago born guitarist that has influenced several people that follow him. Bo Diddley, who was born on December 30, 1992, perhaps should be higher on this list considering the people he influenced. He had a lasting influence on Elvis Presley and was largely responsible for translating blues into rock ‘n’ roll.

Image Credits: Flickr

Image Credits: Flickr

Bo Diddley’s songs are said to have “unleashed a West African groove,” and many have claimed that his songs are easy to follow since they are groovy. Bo Diddley, Who Do You Love and Road Runner are notable songs of Ellas Otha Bates. Buddy Holly, Keith Richards amongst others were inspired to pick up the guitar through the music style of Bo Diddley.

42. Johnny Ramone

Johnny Williams was born on October 8, 1948, and he probably played fewer solos in his career than anyone on this list. Often referred to as John Williams Cummings, he’s another pioneer nonetheless even though he played fewer songs. He’s famous for the unique way he played his Mosrite guitar.

Image Credits: Wikipedia

Image Credits: Wikipedia

Henry Rollins once said, “Johnny was the first guitar player I ever saw play like he was really mad. And I was like, ‘Damn. That’s cool.’” The guitar player for the Ramones was one of the first to play powerful, heavy music up-tempo. Ramone rocked the guitar with tracks like Rockaway Beach, Judy Is a Punk, and Blitzkrieg Bop.

41. Jerry Gracia

Jerome John Garcia was born in Francisco on August 1, 1942. The music star is known to Deadheads as “Jerry.” Many consider the music of Jerry Garcia as the sum of a fusion of different sounds and genre. His listeners can hear a hint of bluegrass, jazz, Spanish guitar, and the famous rock ‘n’ roll from his songs.

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Jerome Gracia influenced the cultural scene of Francisco in the early 1960s, through the “Summer of Love.” His role as the figurehead leader of the Grateful Dead played a role in influencing the people even until his untimely death in 1995. A notable event in his life was in August 1969; he was playing at Woodstock where he almost got electrocuted. Dark star, Casey Jones, and Sugaree are top songs of Jerry Gracia.

40. Joni Mitchell

Rolling Stone magazine placed Roberta Joan Anderson in the #75 spot in the top guitarist list, but we have her higher in this list due to the unique style. She’s got a unique way of tuning her guitar to get different sounds out of every chord. Joni Mitchell was born in Alberta, Canada on November 7, 1943.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

The unique style of Joni Mitchell is that of writing songs with the same chords, but with different tunings. There was a case of her song that had 50 different variations in that style. I had a King, Night in the City, and Nathan La Franeer are popular records of Joni Mitchell, who is also a hell of a songwriter.

39. Buddy Guy

George Guy often referred to as Buddy Guy didn’t stay home for long. Reports have it that the music lord was kicked out promptly by his family due to his disturbance and noise in the house. It seems that nature followed him through his career as some record directors labeled his music style to be “just a bunch of noise.

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Born in Louisiana on July 30, 1936, George Guy eventually broke out in style with his six-stringed instrument. His blues style became popular, and George Guy influenced many (including our #1) on this list. He gained so much popularity and credit for songs like Stone Crazy and First Time I Met the Blues.

38. Tony Iommi

One would have assumed that Anthony Iommi would have limitations with the guitar due to the condition of his fingers. Instead, the loss of the tips of two of his fingers in an industrial accident at the age of 17 contributed to his unique style. The February 19, 1948, Birmingham born star has a guitar style he can free call his own, and believe me; he’s unique.

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Tony’s days with the Black Sabbath group are legendary and memorable and the group still recorded songs up to 2013. The guitarist wasn’t afraid to slow the rhythm for style addition even though he ushered in the era of heavy metal. Notable among his tracks are Children of the Grave, Sabbra Cadabra, and N.I.B.

37. Tom Morello

Tom Morello carved a niche for himself as the lead guitarist of Rage Against Machine. Born in Harlem on May 30, 1964, Tom has a deep interest in social changes right from his graduate days at Harvard University. In this picture, he’s leading a social event in 2011 called Occupy Wall Street.

Image Credits: Wikemedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikemedia Commons

Morello has a unique playing style of creating different sounds with his guitar with an emphasis on the use of effect pedals. The sound produced by Morello was instrumental in Rage’s seemingly hip-hop and heavy metal fusion (Nu Metal). Top chart songs of Morello includes Killing in the Name and Guerrilla Radio.

36. Angus Young

The Scottish born is perhaps more famous for his Chuck Berry-influence rendition even though his blue rock style is memorable. The Chuck Berry style of Angus Young and his schoolboy outfits which made him look like Harry Potter was a unique style, which many people loved. Although, Angus uses a guitar instead of Harry’s holly wand.

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Angus Young inspired many thundering power chord-laden guitarists in the music industry. His songs like Highway to Hell and Back in Black were inspirational to a generation of rhythmic artists that play the guitar. Angus has been rocking since he was 18 years old with AC/DC and that totals 46 years with the rock band in his career.

35. Brian May

Brian May, like Tome Morello, had a strong educational background and he holds a degree in astrophysics. He was born in London, England on July 1947, and his band has enjoyed success in the music industry. May’s band (Queens) made a wave and rocked the atmosphere since the 1970s.

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Brian is a man with many talents; he, along with his father, designed the guitar that gave us Stone Cold Crazy and Bohemian Rhapsody. Brian made use of firewood to build the Red Special, which is also known as ‘the Old Lady.’ Besides, the talented guitarist is also an accomplished songwriter with Doing All Right to his credit.

34. Willie Nelson

Willie Nelson has come a long way in his music career, but his days as bible salesman and cotton picker are fresh memories. Born in Texas on April 29, 1933, Nelson’s music career spanned 60 years of thrilling his audience with his style. Throughout his reign, he used the same guitar named ‘Trigger,’ the same he is holding in this picture.

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Although Trigger has been patched up along the way, there seems to be no perfect companion nor a replacement for Nelson’s guitar that produces a hint of country, rocks, blues, gypsy, and even jazz. He’s best known for songs such as Night Life and Whiskey River. Nelson still rocks until this day also though he is 86 years young now.

33. Robby Krieger

Robby Krieger was a latecomer to the Doors group. The California born guitarist is the last permanent member to join the Doors. Joining the Doors was a great one for the group; Robby’s skills in jazz and flamenco was a significant contribution to the unique sound the group produced whenever they were on stage.

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Robby had a big challenge after joining the Doors. The group had no rhythm guitar section nor a bass player; that meant he had a big void to fill when it comes to sound production for the group. Robby is also an excellent songwriter with Roadhouse Blues and Riders on the Storm to his credit.

32. The Edge

David Evens, who is better known as The Edge, is a unique personality when it comes to playing the guitar. He was born in Essex, England on August 8, 1961. While we admit the unique playing style of The Edge, it has been said that David taught himself how to play the six-stringed instrument.

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

Image Credits: Wikimedia Commons

He received the nickname The Edge at a young age, perhaps due to his attitude of trying to excuse himself from things but be on edge. It may also be due to the angular shape of his head that made people coin that name for David. The Edge joined U2 in the late 1970s, and many have noticed how he compliments his sound to the vocals of frontman Bono. He’s also famous for songs such as The Fly, I Will Follow, and Pride (In the Name of Love.)

31. Elmore James

Elmore James was born on January 27, 1918, in Richland, Mississippi. He learned how to play stringed instruments when he was a child starting with the diddley bow, a one-stringed instrument. James began rocking as soon as he got his first guitar.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

His experienced learning to play guitar with his one-stringed instrument might have influenced his style of the guitar as James was famous with for his slide. One guitarist once said they practiced James’ music until his fingers bled before he realized James used a slide. James is best known for songs such as The Sky is Crying and Dust My Broom. His place in bringing blues to rock is also notable among music stars.

30. Scotty Moore

Scooty Moore made a quick pair with Elvis Presley in the early 1950s. With the addition of Bill Black (bass guitarist) to the group, the trio would go on to cause a significant change in music forever. Moore was born in Gadsden, Tennessee on December 27, 1931.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

The group didn’t have a drummer when they started, that was a massive void, which Moore was going to fill. The trio came up with the slapback echo effect and the song That’s All Right on a night they were screwing around in June 1954. Moore was helpful in Elvis comeback in 1968, and he is best known for songs such as Heartbreak Hotel, Mystery Train and That’s All Right.

29. Muddy Waters

Many know McKinley Morganfield as ‘Muddy Waters,’ he was born in Issaquena, Mississippi on April 4, 1913. At his mid-20 days, McKinley moved to Chicago and there, he introduced his southern-blue style to the Midwest scene. The mix of southern and blues style would be what later defined as Chess Records sound.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

The Rolling Stones coined their name after Waters’ Rolling Stone song of 1950. McKinley was a major also played in the band that included Buddy Guy, the legendary guitarist. Although he experienced a wane in popularity in the 1960s, he saw a resurgence in fame and career in the early 70s, which grew until his death.

28. Tom Petty (shout out to Mike Campbell)

Tom Petty was born on October 20, 1950, in Gainesville, Florida. Tom is obviously the team lead of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, but we find it necessary to mention Mike Campbell (the group lead guitarist). The simple style of Mike Campbell made him prominent among his fans. He’s well-known for saying:

'never use 10 notes if two will suffice'.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

As for Tom Petty, who embraced Sothern rock or heartland, he was always at his best whenever a great guitarist next to him. At the time Tom released Full Moon Fever, his first solo album, Campbell was behind most of the solos. The duo is notable for songs such as You Got Lucky and Breakdown.

27. Frank Zappa

Frank Zappa was a man of many talents. The Baltimore, Maryland born guitarist dabbled into different genres of music ranging from jazz to Musique concrete. Born on December 21, 1940, Frank produced all the albums which he was part of, totaling 60. Out of all his solos, his work with Mothers of Invention was the most notable.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

Willie the Pimp and In-a-Gadda-Stravinsky, are among the highest-trafficked songs of his group, and they each featured a solo of Frank Zappa. Many believed that Zappa stretched the boundaries of what a guitar can do. And if you ever check out Shut Up ‘n’ Play Yer Guitar, you will be amazed at the 1981 solo. 

26. Billy Gibbons

It’s not a surprise that Billy Gibbons dipped into music since his father was a maestro. The famous rock ‘n roller of ZZ Top fame was born on December 16, 1948, at Houston Texas. Fortunately, Billy parent supports his musical prowess, and they made an effort to introduce him to Elvis in a concert. Billy also enjoyed friendship with Jimi Hendrix briefly before he passed on.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

With all the talents wired into Billy’s brain, he helped form ZZ Top when he was just 20 years old. Billy is known for many songs such as Tush, and Gimme your Lovin. And if you have ever enjoyed the  La Grange's rhythm of Get slapped and turned on its head by Gibbons’ guitar, it means you are a true fan of ZZ Top.

25. David Gilmour

David Gilmour was not the original guitarist for Pink Floyd, but he eventually became the lead guitarist of the team. He was born in Cambridge, England on March 6, 1946. You will be surprised to know how David started playing the guitar; he borrowed one from a neighbor and never returned it.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

Gilmour was one who loved to add effect to his music, and that was obvious in the Dark Side of the Moon album. As an upcoming star, he has visited the hospital because of malnutrition before and now he’s worth over $122 million. Shine On You Crazy Diamond, and Comfortably Numb are notable songs of David Gilmour.

24. Joe Perry

Anthony Perry, mostly known by his middle name Joe, was born on September 10, 1950, in Massachusetts. Joe was distinct in his career, and playing next to one of the most formidable voices in rock ‘n’ roll probably made him stand out. Joe was always at his best when he rocks with Aerosmith with playing with Steven Tyler by his side.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

Joe’s style is familiar but unique at the same time. Rolling Stone magazine once said that his rifts are like “blues-on-steroids” and its believed that he was influenced by Jeff Beck, a great solo artist that acquired sound from different parts of the world. Walk This Way, Dream On, and Janie’s Got a Gun are songs popular with Perry and Aerosmith.

23. Slash

Slash is one of the names that would come to mind when you think of rock stars with drug-fueled and sex-crazed styles. Even the drunk-laden form of Slash, the London born musician still brought some restraint to the guitar. Born on July 23, 1965, Slash had a prolific solo career, and he's forever associated with Guns N’ Roses.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

A few of his tracks are legendary, and some that come to mind include, Sweet Child O’ Mine (performed with Guns N’ Roses) and November Rain. At a time, Slash left the Guns N’ Roses and joined Velvet Revolver, a group that included Washed Youth and musicians from Stone Temple Pilots. Now, Slash is back to Guns N’ Roses with Axl, and they are yet to stop rocking until now.

22. Buddy Holly

You can thank Buddy Holly if you have ever rocked the songs the Beatles or Eric Clapton. Charles Holly often referred to as Buddy Holly was a Texas-born musician on September 7, 1936, who invented the rock band. In his group, a bass and drum section was present while Holly sand vocals and plucked the guitar.

Image Credits: Steve Oroz/Michael Ochs Archives

Image Credits: Steve Oroz/Michael Ochs Archives

If Holly had lived a little longer, he would have probably seen an entire generation of bands that were invented based on his style. He had a mix of blues and country sound in his style as he rocks at the same time. Holly is famous for songs such as That’ll Be the Day and Peggy Sue.

21. Neil Young

As a young prodigy, Neil Young was never discouraged from following his dream even though he was diagnosed with epilepsy during his Buffalo Springfield days. Neil was just exceptional in with the music notes he creates; be it playing in rolling solo or a band. 

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

Neil is famous for his records with the Buffalo Springfield which include For What it’s Worth and Mr. Soul. However, his solo ‘Down the River’ also made a wave among song lovers. Trey Anastasio described the music this way:

It’s one-note, but it’s so melodic, and it just snarls with attitude and anger. It’s like he desperately wants to connect.

20. Dick Dale

Richard Monsour is popularly known as Dick Dale. He was born on the east coast of Boston, Massachusetts on the 4th day of May 1937. As a teenager, his family relocated to Southern California where the originator of "surf rock" started surfing at age 17.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

His type of music was fast and loud such that any parents would have their children turn it down eventually. He was so fast with the strumming of his six-stringed instrument. Some of his famous songs are The Peter Gunn Theme and Misirlou.

19. Freddie King

On the 3 September, 1934 in Gilmer, Texas, a music star, Freddie King was birthed. Owing to his "incendiary" live performances and large build, he is often called the "The Texas Cannonball." He reportedly played the guitar with a metal pick meat, producing a distinct sound for a banjo.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

The famous Eric Clapton informed fans during an interview in 1985 that his start on his music path can be credited to Freddie's 1961 song, I Love the Woman. Freddie garnered popularity with songs like The Stumble, Have You Ever Loved a Woman, and Hide Away. He is known to perfectly blend blues and rock. Reports have it that he was a pioneer blues performer who featured a multiracial band.

18. Kurt Cobain

The popular Kurt Cobain was born on the 20th of February 1967 in Aberdeen, Washington. At age 14, Kurt had to choose between a used guitar and a bike as his uncle's birthday present. Of course, you already know his choice by now. Elvis was given a similar choice to make too; only that his was a rifle and not a bike.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

Cobain is known as the pioneer of "grunge," a blend of rock and punk. His band, Nirvana, did songs that were considered rather too loud like heavy metal. On some occasions, they did quiet and melodic songs as well. Some of his popular songs include All Apologies, Heart Shaped Box, and Smells Like Teen Spirit

17. John Lennon

John Lennon is the famous rhythmic guitarist of the Beatles, a popular band back in history. He was given birth to on the 9th October 1940 in Liverpool, England. He is known to be able to transform any string of notes into a head-bobbing rhythm or a hip-shaking beat.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

Arguably, the Beatles has sold close to one billion records, making it the best-selling band in history. If you want to have a feel of Lennon's guitar, you can listen to the following songs: Help!, Yer Blues, and Day Tripper. It is believed that he has not been well credited for his prowess with the guitar. Lennon had this to say: 'They call George the invisible singer. I am the invisible guitar player'.

16. George Harrison

George Harrison, who was born on February 25, 1943, in Liverpool, England is the second member of the Beatles band. Hardly is there any rock lover who has been following happenings in the industry for half a decade now that will not know him. He was considered to be the third-best lagging behind stars John Lennon and Paul McCartney. However, he surpassed them both for a while when he went solo.

ImageCredits: History101.com

ImageCredits: History101.com

George was a great songwriter. He wrote Beatles' hit songs, Here Comes the Sun and Taxman. He is known to have written no less than two songs of every Beatles album after 1965. Here is Tom Petty's thought of his playing: 'He was very in tune when he played, the slide was very precise and just had a beautiful vibrato on it'.

15. Albert King

Albert Nelson, who is mostly called Albert King for his exceptional talent, was born on 25 April 1923 in Indianola, Mississippi. Due to his smooth singing and size, many people called him "The Velvet Bulldozer." In 1968, the star said he had no influences for his playing style because according to him, everything he did was wrong. He was lefthanded, but surprisingly played guitars for righthanded people.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

He was able to play a righthanded guitar because he turned it upside down when playing it. Popular music stars, Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton, commended him for his wonderful play. In fact, in 1967, Hendrix was starstruck after Albert opened for him. Albert's hit songs are As the Years Go Passing By and Born Under a Bad Sign.

14. Joe Walsh

Joe Walsh is a renowned guitarist who was born in 1947 in Wichita, Kansas. For the people of his generation who likes good music, many would have moved to his rhythm and bass style music that combines with a wild side. He has been a part of several bands with the most successful being the Eagles. Not many people know that his middle name is Fiddler.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

Walsh did not join the Eagles early, but their all-time hit song was Hotel California. The song was released in 1975, the year he joined the team. He is among the best guitar solos in history. His best songs are Funk #49 and Rocky Mountain Way.

13. Prince

Prince Nelson is an artist who is well-skilled with the guitar. The absolute showman was born on 7 June 1958 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He reportedly wrote many songs with the first, Funk Machine, at age 7.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

Prince is popular for his songs such as When Doves Cry, Kiss, and the solo that lives on, Purple Rain. Many people have compared his sounds with that of Jimi Hendrix. But, he disagreed with that notion and once said, "If they really listened to my stuff, they’d hear more of a Santana influence than Jimi Hendrix". 

12. Pete Townshend

Pete Townsend is one famous guitarist that is known for his intense nature. It was reported that he once smashed his guitar while he was on stage.  One thing though is that he somehow finds his name on lists like this one. It was on 19 May 1945 that this great guitarist was born in Middlesex, England.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

Late in his career, he decided to go solo, but he was popular for his works with The Who band. The band was distinct in that they placed emphasis on bass and drums. Some of his songs include I Can See for Miles, My Generation, and the cover, Summertime Blues.

11. Stevie Ray Vaughan

One will think that Stevie Ray Vaughan's music sucks looking at this photo here. However, the reverse is the case considering that he is an expert at playing his guitar. It's obvious actually for a man that can play the guitar behind his back. Stevie was born on October 3, 1954, in Dallas, Texas.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

He successfully blended jazz and rockability, but it wasn't without the influence of legends like Eric Clapton, B.B. King, and Jimi Hendrix. His hit songs include Love Struck Baby, Look at Little Sister and Cold Shot. It is possible that Vaughan would have had more hit songs if not for his demise in 1990 via a horrific helicopter crash.

10. Duane Allman

It was unfortunate when the news of Allman's demise reached his fans. He was born on 20 November 1946 in Nashville, Tennessee. The young Duane "Skydog" Allman died at age 24 from a motorcycle crash. Robert Randolph had this to say of Allman's death: "Duane died young, and it’s just one of those things. You could tell he was going to get 50 times better".

Image Credits: Warner Bros/Telepictures Productions

Image Credits: Warner Bros/Telepictures Productions

A unique quality he had while playing the guitar was precision. He was part of the Allman Brothers and was famous for his slide guitar work in songs like Blue SkyWhipping Post, and Statesboro Blues. Allman is also known for his intentive improvisational skills. It is good to know that in 2011, he ranked number 2 in Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time. Come 2011; he jumped to number 9 on the list.

9. Carlos Santana

Born on 20 July 1947 in Jalisco, Mexico, Carlos Santana grew to become a famous guitarist. He had to relocate to San Francisco at a very early age. He became popular in the area before the arrival of the Summer of Love. After playing at Woodstock as an upcoming guitarist, he reached national fame.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

According to Prince, he was influenced more by Santana as compared to Jimi Hendrix. Prince believed that Santana was better at playing the guitar. Some of his works include Soul Sacrifice, Oye Como Va, and Black Magic Woman. Santana credited his finding his voice to LSD. In his words, "You cannot take LSD and not find your voice".

8. B. B. King

Riley B. King popularly referred to as "B. B. King,"  was born on September 26, 1925, in Itta Bena, Mississippi. During the era he was born, pure form of blues was reigning. He became a singer and guitarist who expresses his feelings via singing and playing of the guitar. 

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

King was very hard-working; in 1956 alone, performing in close to 342 shows. In the 70s, he performed at an average of 200 shows yearly. 3 OÇlock Blues, Sweet Little Angel, and The Thrill Is Gone are some of his popular songs. B. B. King is one of the three greatest guitarists for blues. The other two are Albert and Freddie King.

7. Jeff Beck

Jeff Beck never really settled with a particular band. He was always changing from one to another. During his short stay with the Jeff Beck Group, the band had two successful albums. He was born on 24th June 1944 in Surrey, England. Note that he is different from Beck, who never made this list.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

He is a real solo artist who still rocks till date at age 74. His innovative and creative skills know no bound. Beck has been able to combine sounds from various parts of the world. For instance, he once combined jazz with sounds from India. Some of his famous songs include I Ain't Superstitious, A Day in the Life, and Heart Full of Soul.

6. Eddie Van Halen

There is hardly anyone who can beat Eddie in his style of holding a pick. The popular guitarist was given birth to in Amsterdam, the Netherlands on 26th January 1955. Usually, Eddie Van Halen uses his thumb and middle finger to hold the guitar and drags his fingers over the strings. According to some artists, it always looked like he added another instrument.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

Here are some of his tracks that made him famous: Ain't Talking 'Bout Love, Eruption, and Hot for Teacher. Mike McCready of Pearl Jam said the following about Eddie style: "You can play the things he’s written, but there’s an ‘X-factor’ that you can’t get".

5. Keith Richards

Wow! It's now time for the fun part of this list - the top five guitarists in history. So, the first guitarist to consider in the top five is Keith Richards, the Rolling Stones legend. He was born on 18 December 1943 in Kent, England. Apart from being the band's rhythm guitarist, he happens to also be the lead guitarist. He is just so good.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

An artist, the E. Street Band's Nils Lofgren pointed out that the technique with which Richard tunes his guitar is distinct. One can choose to play Richards songs like that of Van Halen, but they will sound different. Richard's popularity comes from songs like Gimme Shelter, (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction, and Paint it Black.

4. Chuck Berry

Most people call him Chuck, but his real name is Charles Berry. He is a great guitarist born on 18 October 1926 in St. Louis, Missouri. He is known for his blues style. He did not only stick to his roots, but he also rocked it perfectly. Do you know his skill was influential to most rock "n" roll guitar stars in history?

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

It will be hard to forget Berry's role in the creation of rock "n" roll. The remaining members of this list have him to thank for that. His Johnny B. Goode song is said to be among the top guitar solos in history. Other songs he is known for include Roll Over Beethoven and Maybellene.

3. Jimmy Page

Jimmy Page's fans cut across different generations. Of course, it was expected, owing to his unmatched talent in handling the guitar. A special mention must be made of the way he handles the two guitars you see in the picture. There is the unique rhythm he created with the double-necked Gibson guitar. He was born on 9 January 1944 in Middlesex, England.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

Jimmy was the lead guitarist for the band, Led Zeppelin. He wrote several songs and worked hard at all times. It is reported that he always fine-tunes his guitar to ensure fans get the best of sounds. Some of his songs include Kashmir, Dazed and Confused, and Heartbreaker.

2. Eric Clapton

It is mindblowing how Eric Clapton combined smooth, basic sounds and simple notes to create melodies that live on forever. Most guitar greats either master playing blues guitar or adopted blues style guitar. Only a few can fuse rock "n" roll properly, and Clapton is one of those. He was born on 30 March 1945 in Surrey, England.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

During his early career times, he joined the Cream band where he played in a company of two other jazz guitarists. But, he was quoted later as saying he was "just trying to keep up." He went on to create astonishing sounds which marked the beginning of something he could never imagine about his career. His best songs are White Room, Bell Bottom Blues, and Crossroads.

1. Jimi Hendrix

Finally, we present to you the number one guitarist of all times, Jimi Hendrix. There is no list of top guitarist that his name has not come out top. Jimi was born on 27 November 1942 in Seattle, Washington. Although Hendrix career was the shortest of all the guitarists in this list, he is considered the god of guitar.

Image Credits: History101.com

Image Credits: History101.com

He was simply out of this world because only alien madmen could create the types of sounds he created. He was first to perfect feedback and knew how best to combine notes and chords. It was surprising that he was sane and produced his sounds effortlessly. His top songs include Foxy Lady and Purple Haze. He also has a rendition named The Star-Spangled Banner.