50 Most Spectacular, Weird And Unusual Places in the World

The world is blessed with brilliant and extremely creative minds -some of these people are architects and builders who construct mind-blowing structures. From the Crooked House in Portland to Dracula's castle and the mysterious  Stonehenge, we have 50 complied weird, unusual and impressive architecture in the world just for your amusement. Trust us; you are in for an exciting ride! 

The Crooked House

Do not be confused; the curves on this three-story building located in Sopot, Portland, is authentic! The building is often referred to as “Krzywy Domek” in Poland, which is a direct translation for “crooked house.” The weirdly shaped building was constructed in 2004, and it is above 43,000 square feet.

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historydaily.org

The building was designed by Szotyńscy & Zaleski, who were motivated by the fairytale sketches and drawings of Polish illustrator -Jan Marcin Szancer and Per Dahlberg. The structure is part of the Rezydent shopping center, and it is the most photographed buildings in Poland. In case, you planning on checking out the place, once in the area, you can get access to the building either through Monte Cassino or Morska Streets

The Offices of the Central Institution of Prague

This space you are looking at is the offices of the Central Social Institution of Prague in Czechoslovakia. Even though this picture was taken on 26th April 1937, the place remains to date. Information and data on mostly every Czech citizen are kept here, so we are not surprised that it is the largest perpendicular letter file in the world.

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historydaily.org

The architecturally distinctive building has cabinet systematically arranged from floor to ceiling tiers. This encompasses more than 4000 square feet with about 3000 drawers 10 feet long -these drawers are electrically controlled to open and close. Also, its elevator desks are electrically operated to move in all directions. This place looks so amazing, however, don't you think it's time they began computerizing the records?

Dracula's Castle, Romania

Yaay! We have finally found the home of Dracula --we are just kidding! Of course, we all know Dracula is a fictional character, so it's impossible for him to have a real home. However, this castle is authentic. This architecturally unique structure is known as Bran Castle. It is located close to Bran, and Brașov found on the Transylvanian part of the border with Wallachia in Romania. However, the building is also known as “Dracula’s Castle.”

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historydaily.org

The author of “Dracula” -Bram Stoker depicted his literacy's character home as “crumbling,” which bears no significant resemblance to Bran Castle. Nonetheless, the person who most likely inspired the fictional vampire -Vlad the Impaler has been historically connected to the castle. Vlad the Impaler was the notorious and vicious ruler of Wallachia irregularly between 1448-1476. Vlad is known for his brutal killings in war during his lifetime; he once impaled bodies of his foes and citizens on huge spikes.

Brain Sandwich Drive-In, St.Louis 

No, St. Louisiana do not sell nor consume human brains. Back in the days, around the late 1800s, St.Louis became famous for its unique fried-brain sandwiches. The dish contains slices of calves’ brains, rye or white toast, and sometimes onions. The advertising sign on a building in the above picture (photo taken in 1978) once found at  Choteau Avenue drew customers to a drive-in that sold the special dish for 25 cents.

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historydaily.org

The spot became so popular that It was the point of a passing joke among the St.Louis population --if any one of them acted foolishly, they would give the individual a quarter and direct them to grab a brain at Choteau Avenue. Now, the building has been demolished, and a hospital stands on its spot today. However, the good news is, brain sandwiches are still sold in St.Louis today!

The Mystifying Stonehenge

Stonehenge is a prehistoric monument located on Salisbury Plain in England. The monument has a ring of huge stones standing about 30 feet high with an approximate weight of 25 tons --they are known as “sarsens.” Stonehenge's smaller stones are known as “bluestones” and they weigh approximately 4 tons. Archaeologists are convinced that the place was constructed from 3000 BC to 2000 BC.

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historydaily.org

However, there are still lots of mystery surrounding Stonehenge --who built the monument? What was its purpose? How were the stones conveyed to the site? How long did it take to erect Stonehenge? Even though lots of legend and folktales have tried providing answers to these questions, they seem not to be sufficient. Stonehenge stands as a British cultural icon to date. This photo was taken in 1867.

A Stone-Carved House 

In his quest for solitude, a 15th Century Romanian monk -St. Daniel the Hesychast built this incredibly stunning stone-carved home. Around 1450, the monk stayed close to the Neamts Monastery by the Secu Creek for 14 years. However, when he began attracting and receiving many visitors, he decided to retreat to a private residence where he could live in solitude. This led to the construction of this stone-carved house.

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historydaily.org

While stone is a good building material because of its strength and durability, it is exhausting and takes a long time to construct with. It must have taken St.Daniel a long time for him to construct this residence wholly out of rocks. The house is located in Putna, now known as the northern Romanian region of Bukovina. As time by legend, St.Daniel spent about 20 years living as a hermit in his stone home. The place is open to tourists and pilgrims today.

“A Masked Ball” - Huge Water Stage Built for Bregenz Performing Arts Festival in Austria 

This is a mind-blowing masterpiece! We bet that was how the audience of The Bregenzer Festspiele  -Bregenz Festival felt during the theatrical show of “A Masked Ball” by Giuseppe Verdi between 1999-2000. Bregenzer Festspiele is popular for constructing some of the most spectacular stages ever. Do you know what's more interesting?

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historydaily.org

The stages are built on water -Lake Constance; yes! They float on water. The opera stage in the above picture depicts a huge book stage being opened by a giant skeleton. In reality, building such a fantastic stage on the water can be very complex, yet the Bregenz festival never stops leaving its audience in awe every year. Who is ready to attend the next festival?

A Stunning Painted Row of Books in Kansas City Public Library

This beautifully painted row of books is found across the south wall of the Central Library's parking garage on 10th St. between Wyandotte St. and Baltimore Avenue. It is the parking garage for the Central Branch of the public library. The garage seems to be a row of books assembled on a shelf. These books are about 25 feet high and nine feet wide.

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historydaily.org

The parking garage was constructed in 2006 because they needed additional parking space close to the library. You can see the names of epic literary works, such as “Fahrenheit 451”, “The Lord of the Rings,” “Romeo and Juliet” and “Charlotte’s Web.” Today, It is one of the most prominent features of Kansas City.

The Rosary Chapel --Templo de Santo Domingo in Puebla, Mexico

This is Templo de Santo Domingo in Puebla, Mexico. While there seems to be nothing spectacular about its exterior -in it lies an unimaginable structure called “The Capilla del Rosario” — the Rosary Chapel. It is one of Mexico’s most splendid baroque chapels.

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historydaily.org

The chapel was constructed between 1650-1690 as an additional structure to the Santo Domingo Church. It is known as the first chapel Mexico devoted to the Lady of the Rosary. The inside of the chapel is adorned with paintings, sculptures, and gold. Light from above falls on the gold leaf giving the building an incredible look and making it glow. This is a place you truly need to visit.

The Grand Staircase Copper King Mansion, 1884 Butte, Montana

The Copper King Mansion is located at Butte, Montana. It was constructed by William Andrew Clark in 1884. Clark was one of Montana's three famous Copper Kings. All the three barons acquired a large amount of wealth, and all tried to surpass each other by portraying their wealth, which included their magnificent hall of residence. Clark's home has 34-rooms beautifully designed with Romanesque Revival Victorian architecture.

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historydaily.org

It also features fresco colored ceilings, gas, and electric chandeliers, stained glass windows, and imported wood parquets. One of the most prominent parts of the home is the Grand Staircase, which was made with hand-carved wood. The mansion made it to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970. Of course, you can visit and feed your eyes with beautiful features of the home.

The Old Cincinnati Public Library 

Who wouldn't love to read here? This is the Old Cincinnati Public Library constructed in 1874. It is adorned with a cathedral-like hall, huge skylight roof, iron spiral staircases, checkerboard marble floors and five levels of bookshelves. The cost of construction of the library was about $383,594.53 -close to $7.7 million today. The original library structure, referred to as Old Main, survived for 85 years at 629 Vine St., near the old Enquirer Building.

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historydaily.org

However, in the 1920s, there were requests made for a new library building. The Old public library has Books stacked beyond reach, ventilation grew worse, and even its paint began peeling. Due to the this, the building of a new library was considered, and that led to the construction of the “Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County” located at 800 Vine St. in 1955. In the same year, The old building was bought by the Leyman Corp. for the sum of $615,000 and was demolished. Now a parking lot can be found at the site where this historical gem once stood.

Jedburgh Abbey 

Here lies Jedburgh Abbey, a wrecked Augustinian abbey which was established in the 12th century. It is located in the town of Jedburgh, in the Scottish Borders about 16km north of the border with England situated at Carter Bar. The Abbey is one of the six abbeys you’d find on the famous tourist site -Scotland's Border Abbey Way Walk. It was initially a priory before it attained the status of a monastery.

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historydaily.org

Following the defeat of Earl of Surrey in 1297 by William Wallace, the English enacted their revenge by ravaging the Jedburgh Abbey. However, Robert the Bruce of Scotland, never stops visiting the church to show to England that his faith is strong, just like the abbey itself. Today, the abbey is in the custody of Historic Environment Scotland as a monument.

The 14-story Neo-Gothic Pabst Building 

The Pabst Building was a 14-story, 72-meter tall neo-gothic structure in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The building which holds the reputation for being the first skyscraper in Milwaukee was built in 1891. It was also the highest building in Milwaukee until Milwaukee City Hall was constructed four years later. It was Q4Milwaukee's first skyscraper and was the tallest building in Milwaukee until the Milwaukee city hall was finished four years later.

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historydaily.org

Frederick Pabst, the owner of Pabst building, was well-known to engage himself in several civic projects, including the construction of the Pabst Building. He also constructed the Pabst Theater, an opera house, in 1895. Unfortunately, the Pabst Building was pulled down in 1981, and the East Wisconsin Building now sits on the site.

The Street Nicknamed "Newspaper Row" Boston, Massachusetts 

This well-known street is nicknamed “Newspaper Row,” it is situated in a district in Boston, Massachusetts. Before the innovation of radio and television, newspapers were the sole means of accessing world news and making it available to the public. So, Bostonians would gather at Newspaper Row to get current news, because of this, the place is usually crowded.

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historydaily.org

Also, apart from printing newspapers, many publishers would write the latest news or updates they got on the telegraph wires on a big chalkboard found on the window of their offices. In 1983, Newspaper Row was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Then in 2003, the Bostonian Society enacted a historical marker at the former abode of the Boston Globe, 244 Washington Street.

The View of the New York City Skyline, the 1920s

As far back as in the 1920s, New York City had a number of skyscrapers that completed with others in the world. Following World War 1, the United States experienced a building boom in most of its prominent cities, and New York was not excluded. Notably, there was significantly a large increase in the number of skyscrapers constructed between 1925 and 1931.

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historydaily.org

Furthermore, the height of the structures also greatly increased from an average of 40 stories to 70 stories in the 1920s. This photograph depicts how the tall skyscrapers poked through the foggy cloud.  We are indebted to whoever took this photograph for giving us a glimpse of the glitz of the New York skyline back in the days.

Old Vennel Off High Street Glasgow 

The picture series titled “Old Vennel Off High Street, Glasgow” is the first record and depiction of slum housing in the history of photography. The work was carried out by the Scottish -Fife-born- photographer Thomas Annan in 1868. In 1866, Anann was endowed with the responsibility by The City Improvement Trust to capture the inner city of Glasgow.

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historydaily.org

The area was one of the most awful urban slums in Britain. It had been planned for demolition by the City Improvement Trust, but they decided to get picture records of these poorer cities first, and this led them to Annan. The photograph above is one of the thirty-one photographs in the series depicting old Glasgow.

One of 36 bridges in Central Park, New York 

Central Park, situated in New York City’s Upper West Side is well-known for a couple of things. Central Park -the 843 square mile oasis- in the middle of one of the busiest cities in America has miles of footpaths, carriageways, and bridle paths with 36 bridges and seven water bodies.

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historydaily.org

Over 40 million visitors annually come to the park to delight in the green range, wooded regions, ponds, and bridges. As we know it, Central Park is the most explored urban park in the country. It has also been featured in about 140 various movies over the years, and also in a couple of TV shows. This bridge in the photo is one of the beautifully built bridges in the Park.

The Morgan Library and Museum, New York City

The Morgan Library & Museum – once known as the Pierpont Morgan Library – is a museum and research library situated at 225 Madison Avenue at East 36th Street right in the Murray Hill area of Manhattan, New York City. It was established to host the personal library of J. P. Morgan in 1906, which consists of his manuscripts and printed books, a couple of them in unusual bindings, and also his set of prints and drawings.

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historydaily.org

The library’s design was created by Charles McKim, one of the founding partners of the firm of McKim, Mead, and White. The cost of construction was $1.2 million, and it was declared a public institution in 1924 by J. P. Morgan's son John Pierpont Morgan, Jr., in agreement with his father's will.

Rockefeller Center, New York, 1939

Right in between 48th and 61st Streets lining Fifth Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, New York City, you'd find the Rockefeller Center. It is a huge complex with 19 commercial buildings sprawling about 22 acres. It was established by John D. Rockefeller between 1931 and 1933. At the center of the complex is the sunken square referred to as Rockefeller Plaza.

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historydaily.org

This is the abode of Radio City Music Hall and the skating rink. Facing the skating rink is the statue of Prometheus, which was built by Paul Manship in 1934. Five additional International-style buildings were later added, and they are situated on the west side of Sixth Avenue and at the north edge of Rockefeller Plaza. Till date, the place is a sight to behold

Ruins of Persepolis in Iran, 1923

Persepolis was the official capital of the Achaemenid Empire between 550–330 BCE. It is found about 60 km northeast of the city of Shiraz in Fars Province, Iran. It was constructed by Darius the Great, starting around 518 B.C.E. The initial remains of Persepolis can be traced back to 515 BCE. It depicts the Achaemenid style of architecture. The site is adorned with limestone structures as well as the renowned Persepolitan Stairway -a double, symmetrical staircase on the Great Wall.

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historydaily.org

The stairway made up of 111 steps has low risers so important visitors could ensure a majestic gait as they climbed them. The top of the stairway leads into a small terrace located across from The Gate of All Nations, as depicted in this photograph. Visitors can explore this stunning site with mind-blowing architectural designs -even in its ruins, you'd appreciate its splendor.

Suburbia Rise in San Francisco, California, 1967

Back in the days, in San Francisco, California, there used to be just rural and urban locale. However, a midpoint between the two, suburbs, was established to enable city dwellers to expand beyond the city limits. Also, for rural dwellers to move nearer to the cities. A notable thing that surged from suburbia was conformity -more like a form of fitting in.

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historydaily.org

In the above picture, you'd see rows of undistinguished homes that were a prominent trend in the suburbs all over the nation. Even the cars, pets, and general lifestyle of the people were in conformity. Particularly, one of the major things about early suburbs that interested and attracted many people was the chance to live and fit in just like others. However, things began to change in 1970, as some people desired special houses.

Singer House, Also Popularly Referred to as the House of Books, is an Art Nouveau Building, Saint Petersburg, Russia

The Russian section of the Singer Sewing Machine Company established this amazing art nouveau structure in Saint Petersburg in 1904 to be the headquarters for the company. The initial plan was to construct a skyscraper similar to the Singer Company’s New York City building.

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historydaily.org

However, there is a building regulation in Saint Petersburg that notes that no structure can be higher than the Winter Palace. The Singer House's architect -Pavel Suzor decided to design this special building that much seems to be nicer than a skyscraper. The building was bequeathed to the Petrograd State Publishing House in 1919. The building later earned the moniker “The House of Books.”

Telephone Tower in Stockholm 

Stockholm’s telephone company established this massive metal tower in 1887 to channel the city’s 5,500 telephone lines from one focal location. In order to make the building more aesthetically appealing, the telephone company employed an architect, Fritz Eckert, to input a couple of unique touches. Eckert made the designs on the structure’s four turrets.

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historydaily.org

The metal grid works stayed firm for over 260 feet tall and were in proper function until 1913 when the telephone enterprise began employing the use of underground telephone lines. Sadly, in 1952, the metal tower was largely destroyed in a fire, and the entire structure was pulled down the next year. In its active years between 1897-1913, the telephone company connected around 5000 telephone lines.

A Catholic Church Constructed into the Rocks in Sedona, Arizona

This is truly spectacular! This is the picture of the Chapel of the Holy Cross, a Catholic Church thrust into Arizona’s dashing red rock arrangement. Motivated by the then-recently-built Empire State Building, Marguerite Brunswig Staude, a local artist and rancher decided to construct a church. She initially prepared to construct the church in Budapest, Hungary, in collaboration with a popular architect, Lloyd Wright, Frank Lloyd Wright's son.

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historydaily.org

However, those plans were hindered when World War II began. Due to this, Staude opted to construct the church in her own society. She chose a site situated in the Coconino National Forest and employed Richard Hein to create a blueprint design for the building. The chapel was opened its doors in 1956.

The Cologne Cathedral Amongst the Wreckage, 1944

In the time of bombing rounds, occupying pilots used the Cologne Cathedral as a reference target for their aerial strikes. The Cathedral was constructed between the period of 1248 and 1473. The neighborhood districts were almost fully demolished in the bombings, but the cathedral stood firm. Majority of the pilots and aeronauts later affirmed that they intentionally prevented bombing the cathedral because of its aesthetic and cultural importance.

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historydaily.org

Even though the church survived about fourteen hits, it stood rugged. When the war finished, renovations were made to the Cologne Cathedral, which was constructed between 1248 and 1473. By 1956, the church was fully renovated. It is a remarkable monument of German Catholicism and Gothic architecture. In 1996, it was named a World Heritage Site.

The Hollywoodland Sign was Originally Put Up in 1923 to Promote a Housing Development Not Hollywood

The famous and outstanding Hollywood sign was not erected in honor of Tinsel Town, it was actually set up to promote a real estate development that was meant to be constructed in the 1920s in the Hollywood Hills. The sign which was put up in 1923 initially read "HOLLYWOODLAND.” The initial plan was to bring down the sign after its purpose had been fulfilled.

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historydaily.org

However, during the period of the Golden Age of Hollywood, the sign became an important symbol of the California movie industry. Die to this, the sign which was originally meant to survive 18 months was left in place, and the “ land” section was removed. Each word in white capital letters is about 45-foot tall and 350 feet long.

Las Vegas Strip in 1940 Vs. Las Vegas Strip in 2017

Who would have thought the site of the widely known Sin City once laid bare?! Sin City has really witnessed a lot of development in just about 75 years. The Pair-O-Dice was the original casino Highway 91 which began operation in 1923, but the 63-room El Rancho Vegas which opened its doors in 1931 was the first hotel and casino resort. The Strip which is approximately 6.8 km in length, is situated at the south of the Las Vegas city limits.

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historydaily.org

Today, the Las Vegas Strip is filled up with upscale casino hotels. The neon-soaked Strip is conventional Las Vegas, gambling floors, the various hotel complexes house, restaurants, and many others. Guy McAfee, who once worked as a Los Angeles police officer, is known to have named the region the Vegas Strip and was inspired by Sunset Strip in his native city.

A Picture of San Francisco Following the Earthquake of 1906

In 1906, the city of San Francisco was hit by a 7.9 earthquake, which ravaged the California city and its inhabitants. The large portion of the buildings in the city was entirely destroyed or survived significant damage. Fires began, and dash unhindered through the wrecks, damaging over 500 blocks in the city. According to news reports, the quake and fires killed about 700 people in the area.

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historydaily.org

However, modern experts are convinced that the death toll may have been as high as 3,000. Over 200,000 residents were rendered homeless as a consequence of the disaster. The strong earthquake which rocked California aided in attracting awareness to construction practices in earthquake territories.

The Awe-inspiring View From About  7,500 Feet Over New York City

In this amazing ethereal nighttime sight of New York City, we can see that the City That Never Sleeps truly never sleeps! This isn't surprising as each block and street is lit up by street lights, and building signs endowed the city with vivaciousness, buoyancy, and life 24/7.

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historydaily.org

Furthermore, the city's subway system never closes; numerous restaurants and bars are open until the early hours of the morning. Also,  the Staten Island Ferry is still fully active at 2 a.m! In the above photograph, the dark patch in the center is Central Park, and if you study it closely, you’d see the looped light array of a number of significant paths of the park.

A Photograph of Times Square Building Taken in 1943 

Here is a photograph of Times Square taken in 1943. Even though it is not as populated with usual crowds as we see today, you can easily spot the One Times Square. The 25-story and 363-foot-high building were initially built for the New York Times Newspaper in 1905. However, after eight years, the paper relocated to a new building on 229 West 43rd Street.

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historydaily.org

In the Big Apple, it stands as one of the most photographed places. Furthermore, it is the site for New York's huge and elaborate New Year's Eve celebration in which numerous visitors gather at Times Square to witness the ball drop ceremony at midnight. Notably, One Times Square has a reputation for being one of the most relevant advertising locations in the world due to the large revenue its ads attracts.

The Shoe House in Pennsylvania Constructed By The Haines Shoe Company

This building probably influenced the nursery rhyme figure “the Old Woman Who Lived in a Shoe.” This unusual building -The Shoe House was constructed as a publicity hype for the Haines Shoe Company, the Shoe House of Pennsylvania. It was built in 1948. Back then, as increase occurred in automobile proprietorship, and post-World War II affluence permitted the family to go on road trips, the tourist buzz began.

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historydaily.org

The Haines Shoe Company used the shoe-shaped house to attract tourists. The twenty-five feet high structure features a living room, kitchen, two bedrooms found in the ankle and soda shop in the arch region. Now, the place is a tourist attraction, and visitors are allowed to explore the building.

Construction Process of One Chase Manhattan Plaza in 1964

This photo depicts the 3,000 Men who were Involved in the Construction of the 813 feet high “One Chase Manhattan Plaza” now Known as “28 Liberty Street” in New York as they assembled for a picture on August 1964. It took thousands of laborers to construct David Rockefeller’s Manhattan Bank building in the early 1960s.

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historydaily.org

The patriarch (from August 2004 to March 2017, when he died at age 101) of the affluent and influential Rockefeller family of New York, David Rockefeller, led the building project owing to the fact that numerous banks had transferred their headquarters to midtown. The glass exterior that hugely reflects sunlight made the banking skyscraper stands out, even till date.

A Chapel in a Treehouse

No, your eyes are not kidding you, it is an actual chapel in a treehouse! This the Chêne Chapelle translated as “chapel oak” in English situated in Allouville-Bellefosse in Seine-Maritime, France. The oak tree is between 800 and 12,000 years old. It endured the Black Death, the Hundred Years War, the reign of King Louis IX, and the French Revolution. It was hit by lightning in the 1600s, which led to a fire outbreak that destroyed a large portion of the tree's outer part.

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historydaily.org

The local priest perceived that this was a sign from above that the tree should be revered as a place of worship. A helix staircase encompassing the tree trunks grants worshippers the access into one of the sanctuaries -the Notre Dame de la Paix or the Chambre de L'Ermite. The tree is starting to experience the flip side of aging, and for safety measures have been put in place.

Destruction Caused by a Boulder that Moved through a House in Italy

A giant boulder from a hilltop removed and crashed down; it took out anything that would hinder its movement. This barn located in Ronchi de Termeno, in Italy was gravely affected by it. The barn was severely smashed by the massive rock. Fortunately, no casualties were recorded in the 2014 incident.

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historydaily.org

Interestingly, the boulder left a large divot as proof of how intense and tough it was. However, this photo doesn't depict is that a second hardly missed the farmhouse standing next to the barn. Such a miracle, we are certain if it had rolled on the house, a couple of people would have gotten hurt.

An Isolated Home on a Rural Island in Iceland

This spot seems like a place a monk would love to live! However, it could also serve as a remarkable vacation destination. Iceland is a place of craggy and irregular isolation with bare, windswept topography. Natives and residents of Iceland are as exuberant as the rural region. Inhabiting a home as barren and isolated as this one in the above picture is most likely not many people's preference.

historydaily.org

historydaily.org

However, the Icelandic, the place is a perfect place to call home. It is important to know that Iceland is not a big country --just about 39,000 square miles-- hence this house which seems alone and far away from other residential areas, there is most possibly a village or town nearby.

A Deserted ''Pirate Tower'' on Victoria Beach Laguna

From the name “ Private Tower,” one would almost conclude that the tower is actually a pirate hideout, but it is actually not. Rather, this building that stands alone on California's Victoria Beach Laguna is referred to as “ La Tour, ” which means the word “ tower” in French. It was built in 1926 by Senator William Edward from California as a means of access for his family to the beach from their summer home.

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historydaily.org

The tower was constructed using poured concrete, and it is fixed to the cliff’s surface. The interior part features a wooden helical staircase with lots of windows to allow light in. Today, it is a historical landmark in California, and definitely not a pirate hideout.

The Sümela Monastery in the Maçka district of Trabzon Area in Turkey

This Greek Orthodox Church, the Sumela Monastery is sculpted out of a cliff. The church building is about 3,900 feet tall on the steep cliff surface in the Pontic Mountains of Turkey. The church is dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and till date, it is still of great importance in Turkey.

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historydaily.org

Sadly, a rockslide occurred on 22 September 2015, and this led to evacuating the place and putting it off-limits to the public. Engineers are working to make sure that the building is safe and firm before it can be granted access to visitors. Beautifully, the reopening was slated for the latter part of 2018. We hope it is now open to everyone.

The Prehistoric Ruins of Dunluce Castle on Top of Mermaids Cave, Northern Ireland

Dunluce Castle is a now-ruined prehistoric castle in Northern Ireland. It was constructed on the edge of a basalt outthrust in County Antrim. The site can be reached through a bridge creating a link between it to the mainland. The castle which was designed perilously towards the cliffs was built in the Late Middle Ages. It is surrounded by cliff walls and has a unique architectural style.

historydaily.org

historydaily.org

For a while, Dunluce Castle was the official seat of the Earl of Antrim. According to legend, one particular day, a big portion of the kitchen suddenly collapsed into the sea. Apparently, the kitchen boy survived the incident because he was sitting on a stool in the part of the kitchen that wasn't affected. Of course, we are not certain about the validity of this story, but the remaining part of the kitchen still stands today.

Amphitheater of Acropolis found on the southwest slope of the Acropolis of Athens, Greece, Greece

Magnificent huh? We thought so too! This old and unique Amphitheater at Acropolis was constructed in 161 AD by Herodes Atticus called The Odeon of Herodes Atticus.  The stone theatre was initially built as a three-story, slanted venue, with a wooden roof made from the cedar of Lebanon wood.

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historydaily.org

Over 5,000 locals would gather en masse into the theatre to be entertained. Comedies, theatrical plays, and musical concerts were held at the Amphitheater in its glory days. Unfortunately, the theatre was wrecked by Heruli in 267 AD and was deserted. Necessary renovations were made in 1950, and it is presently a well-known tourist attraction.

An 800-year-old -Borgund Stave Church Situated n Borgund, Norway

This weird Norwegian building was built by linking vertical wooden boards, called staves. This gave it its name -Borgund Stave Church. Even though it was constructed between 1180 and 1250 AD, parts of the church were added to the initial building later. The construction of the church is absolutely one of a kind.

historydaily.org

historydaily.org

The four corner posts of the church are connected together employing the use of ground sills, and the whole structure stands on a stone foundation. The stave walls are also attached by a tongue and groove system. The church is under the Borgund parish in the Indre Sogn deanery in the Diocese of Bjørgvin. The church no longer serves as a place of worship or religious activities; rather, it is used as a museum operated by the Society for the Preservation of Ancient Norwegian Monuments.

A Deserted "Dr. Suess" House

Situated deep in the Alaskan wilderness is this usual structure named -Willow, Alaska’s Goose Creek Tower, but dubbed a Dr. Seuss home. It was given the moniker because of its close resemblance to the waggish, meaningless drawings of the wonderful Dr. Seuss. According to the narrative, the owner intentionally built the home to get a whole view of Denali -Mt. McKinley- American’s highest mountain.

historydaily.org

historydaily.org

However, he constructed the building right a forest fire, so all of the trees were small at the time. Then, as the tree became taller, they hindered his view of the mountain, so he would add an additional level in order to maintain his view. Today, the house is largely abandoned.

Construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway Bridge Situated in Mountain Creek British Columbia

It wasn't quite an easy work for these men who built this railway bridge. The extensive gorges and sharp cliffs of the Canadian Rockies made it difficult for a railroad track to be constructed, but they found a way around it. In order to solve the problem, they constructed bridges like the ones in the photo.

historydaily.org

historydaily.org

A complicated network of wooden built high in the mountains is needed. A complex network of wooden buttress hold the tracks firmly up. The bridge was constructed at the end of the 1800s, and it took a huge load of intense work done by a crew of courageous and talented builders to cover the gap between mountain ridges with heavily-made trusses. 

An Amazingly Cool 16th Century Italian Fireplace

How would you feel seeing this signature fireplace in a friend’s house on your visit Frightened or amazed? While many might find this scary, we think this fireplace is incredibly cool. Its odd and unique style would captivate anyone. This fireplace is perfect for those who desire and love spectacular features in their home.

Read More: What Historical Figures Actually Looked Like

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historydaily.org

Nonetheless, generally, fireplaces are supposed to be comfortable, cozy, and for course, functional. Due to this, we doubt we'd find a lot of couples who would hold each other tight with a wine in front of them for a romantic dinner beside this fireplace. While we still hold on to the fact that the fireplace is amazing, we cannot deny that it gives off a spooky vibes

Belvedere Castle, Central Park

Belvedere Castle is a folly -an expensive ornamental building with no particular function- located in Central Park in Manhattan, New York City. The castle which was built in 1869 features display rooms and an observation deck. Back in 1919, it was the abode of the official Central Park weather station. The castle’s design was made by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux between 1867-1869. It is an architectural blend of Gothic and Romanesque styles.

historydaily.org

historydaily.org

Originally, Belvedere Castle was built as a shell with an open doorway and window spaces. The major tower has a more prehistorical design, with a weather antenna right on top. However, at the time of the castle's 1983 renovation, the tower was taken back to a German-style with a flag, a weather vane, and an anemometer adorning its top. 

Casa do Penedo, Portugal

If you are thinking this house was inspired by the Flintstones, then you are probably right. Casa do Penedo with English translation ”House of the Rock” is an architectural landmark situated in northern Portugal. The house is stuck between two boulders and constructed from four big boulders. The construction started in 1972 and was finished in 1974. The engineer who constructed the house was from Guimarães.

historydaily.org

historydaily.org

The residence was originally used by the owners as a holiday home. The interior is plain and sparse with amazing architectural style. Today, Casa de Penedo is a small museum which displays relics and photographs from Penedo’s past. It's definitely a place we'd love to visit; we bet you feel the same way too.

The Tinniest City Hall in America, Located in Maskell, Nebraska

Here is the smallest city hall in America. Right in Maskell, Nebraska you'd find this building that was constructed during the Great Depression era. Back then, It was also a pump house, and even though the pump hasn't been operated since the 1950s, it's still found in the basement of the building.

historydaily.org

historydaily.org

The small city hall structure is just 10 feet by 12 feet and affords enough space for the village's four board members, chairperson, and city clerk to hold regular meetings. In case, they'd be more than six members, the meeting venue would be moved to either one of the board members house or shelter house in Maskell Park.

The Popular Longaberger Basket Company's Headquarters, Newark, Ohio

The construction of this seven-story, 180,000-square-foot building was completed in 1997 as the headquarters of the Longaberger Co. Longaberger is well-known for its production of beautifully crafted, but pricey baskets, and pottery. The building was constructed to bear canny resemblance with the company's most valuable products -Longaberger Medium Market Basket. NBBJ and Korda Nemeth Engineering designed the structure.

Read More: The Mysterious Secrets Hidden In Famous Artwork

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historydaily.org

Unfortunately, Longaberger's sales greatly plummeted so much that they had to close down the company in 2018. The building which is known locally as the “Big Basket” had been deserted since 2016, after the company relocated its headquarters. When the company closed down, the large building was put up for sale and eventually sold.

The Breathtaking Prambanan Temple in Indonesia

The Prambanan temple is the largest Hindu temple of old Java dedicated to Lord Shiva. Its first building was finished in the mid-9th century. Rakai Pikatan most probably likely began building the structure as the Hindu Sanjaya Dynasty's response to the Buddhist Sailendra Dynasty's Borobudur and Sewu temples closeby.  Historians postulated that the construction of Prambanan was possibly meant to commemorate the comeback of the Hindu Sanjaya Dynasty to power in Central Java, after close to a century reign of Buddhist Sailendra Dynasty.

historydaily.org

historydaily.org

The Temple is decorated with amazing artwork and reliefs depicting the classic of Ramayana. Over the years, the temples have suffered reasonable damage from the war, earthquakes, and even volcanic eruptions. Luckily, the temple was discovered again, and ever since the 17th century, efforts have been made to preserve the temple historical authenticity.

The Roman Forum, Rome, Italy

A Forum was the primary center of a Roman city. It was commonly situated close to the physical hub of a Roman town. It was a public area in which commercial, religious, economic, political, legal, and social activities took place. It was also the site of significant buildings and events. The Roman Forum as seen in the above picture is a rectangular-shaped plaza encompassed by the ruins of several prominent old government buildings at the heart of the city of Rome.

historydaily.org

historydaily.org

At a time, the Roman Forum was regarded as the most crucial meeting in the world world. Even though, the buildings on the sites have been wrecked, the Roman Forum still attracts over 4.5 million visitors yearly. It is also the site of current archaeology unearthings.

An Emblem of the Cold War -The Construction of the Berlin Wall

After the old Germany was separated into East and West Germany, the city of Berlin developed a number of issues. West Berlin became a geographical escape route for East Germans who wanted to abscond from the Communist East and escape to the democratic West. The East Germans proffered a solution to the problem, and it was agreed upon.

historydaily.org

historydaily.org

Surprisingly, on August 13, 1961, workers put up the Berlin Wall, wholly encompassing West Berlin. Guards were on constant at various areas along the wall, and they ensured that no one his or her way across. The Berlin Wall became a Cold War representation. Due to this, the wall was brought down on November 9, 1989. The above picture was taken during the construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961.  

It is simply amazing that these unique and unusual structures actually existed, and some of them are still standing firm till date. What do you think about these amazing and weird buildings and locations? Which one of them amazed you the most? Let us know in the comment section. If you enjoyed reading this article, do not forget to share it with your friends.

Source: History Daily

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